Dr. Rebecca J. Lloyd

 

Dr. Rebecca Lloyd is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education at the University of Ottawa in Canada. Her Function2Flow model, created in collaboration with Dr. Stephen Smith through a 3 year SSHRC grant, provides an interdisciplinary structure to research, teach and holistically understand mainstream and alternative movement via Functioning, Forming, Feeling and Flowing pathways. Her current 5-year SSHRC grant applies the Function2Flow model as a frame to inspire and understand how teachers, coaches and fitness professionals may align their practice with the goal of helping more Canadians become Inter-Active for Life (IA4L). The Motion-Sensing Phenomenology (MSP) methodology that Dr. Lloyd employs is specifically designed to challenge the objective, taken-for-granted ways we tend to think about movement in our lives. The outcome of a MSP study results in a shift of consciousness where movement is no longer understood as something we ‘have to do’ but rather a central aspect of who we are and what it means to live a vibrant life.


Dr. Lloyd is active in both leading and serving her research community. She has chaired many conferences including the phenomenological International Human Science Conference (IHSRC), the Physical and Health Education (PHE) Canada conference, as well as the Physical Education Teacher Education (PHETE) Special Interest Group (SIG) within The Canadian Society for the Study of Education (CSSE) conference. She was a keynote speaker for the International Physical Literacy Association (IPLA) conference in Bedfordshire, England, an invited speaker for the Japanese Society of Sport Education and a former journal editor for Physical & Health Education (PHE) Canada.


Prior to becoming a fulltime university professor Dr. Lloyd was an international fitness presenter for CanFitPro, IDEA, the YMCA, Keiser, Resist-A-Ball, a motivational speaker and consultant for Skate Canada, an elite personal trainer, and artistic coach/ choreographer. She has recently returned to her roots in professional dance, as she was formerly trained at Les Grands Ballets Canadiens, and now competes and performs at international salsa congresses and events.

 

Dr. Rebecca Lloyd is passionate to share her joy and ways of thinking about movement with you. Please contact her to book keynote presentations, professional development workshops, and motivational speaking engagements.

 


Research Projects:

The Inter-Active for Life Project: Exploring sustained and sustaining movement practices through the interdisciplinary Function2Flow model (2017-2022)

  • Principal Investigator
  • Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada – Insight Grant

For more information about the IA4L research project, click HERE.

Moving to learn and learning to move: A phenomenological inquiry into movement function, feeling, form and flow consciousness within the ‘JungleSport’ school-based program (2010 – 2013)

  • Principal Investigator
  • Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada

For more information about the Moving to Learn and Learning to Move research project, click HERE.

Selected Publications:


Journal Articles:

Wiebe, S., Leggo, C., Conrad, D., Sameshima, P., Gouzouasis, P., James, K., Walsh, S., Fels, L., Richardson, P., Meyer,K., Hasebe-Ludt, E., Snowber, C., Kentel, J.A., & Lloyd, R., (2018). Curriculum as playlist: Responses of synopsis and expansion. Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy, 15 (1), 58-105, DOI: 10.1080/15505170.2018.1437578

Lloyd, R. (2017). The Feeling of Seeing: Factical Life in Salsa Dance. Phenomenology & Practice, 11(1), 58-71

Lloyd, R.J. (2016). Becoming physically literate for life: Embracing the functions, forms, feelings, and flows of alternative and mainstream physical activity. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education, 35(2), 107-116.

Lloyd, R. J. (2015). Learning to let go: A phenomenological exploration of the grip & release in Salsa dance and everyday life. The Journal of Dance, Movement and Spiritualities, 119-140. doi:ISSN: 20517068

Lloyd, R.J. (2015). Approaches to improve physical education in Canadian schools: Teacher education, diversity & curriculum supports. Japanese Journal of Sport Education Studies, 35(2), 73-89.

Knowles, K. & Lloyd, R.J. (2015). Teeters, (taught)ers, and dangling suspended moments: Phenomenologically orienting to the (moment)um of pedagogy. Phenomenology & Practice, 9(1), 71-83.

Lloyd, R.J. (2015). From dys/function to flow: Inception, perception and dancing beyond life’s constraints. The Humanistic Psychologist, 43(1), 24-39. doi:10.1080/08873267.2014.952416

Lloyd, R.J. (2015). The ‘Function to Flow’ (F2F) Model: An interdisciplinary approach to assessing movement within and beyond the context of climbing. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 20(6), 571-592. doi:10.1080/17408989.2014.895802

Lloyd, R.J. (2012). Hooping through interdisciplinary intertwinings: Curriculum, kin/aesthetic ethics and energetic vulnerabilities. Journal of the Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies, 10(1), 4-27.

Lloyd, R.J. (2012). Moving to learn and learning to move: A phenomenological exploration of children’s climbing with an interdisciplinary movement consciousness. The Humanistic Psychologist, 40(1), 23-37.

Howard, T. & Lloyd, R. (2012). To feel a look, to see the flesh: Phenomenological reflections of a pierced and tattooed pre-service teacher. Cultural and Pedagogical Inquiry, 4(2), 38-50.

Lloyd, R.J. (2011). Running with and like my dog: An animate curriculum for living life beyond the track. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 27(3), 117-133.

Lloyd, R.J. (2011). Awakening movement consciousness in the physical landscapes of literacy: Leaving, reading, and being moved by one’s trace. Phenomenology & Practice, 5(2), 70-92. doi:www.phandpr.org/index.php/pandp/article/download/93/142

Lloyd, R.J. (2011). Health related fitness: An interdisciplinary approach to implementation in physical and health education. Education Review, 1(2), 6-7.

Lloyd, R.J. (2011). Le conditionnement physique pour améliorer la santé: une approche interdisciplinaire pour l’application pratique en éducation physique et à la santé. Revue D’Éducation, 1(2), 6-7.

Lloyd, R.J. (2011). Teaching games with inner sense: Exploring movement consciousness in women’s volleyball. PHEnex journal/revue phénEPS, 3(2), 1-17.

Lloyd, R.J., & Smith, S.J. (2009). Enlivening the curriculum of health-related fitness, Educational Insights, 13 (4). www.ccfi.educ.ubc.ca/publication/insights/v13n04/articles/lloyd_smith/index.html

Lloyd, R., (2008). Editorial, Physical & Health Education (PHE), 74 (3), 4-5.

Lloyd, R., (2008). Editorial, PHE, 74(2), 4-5.

Lloyd, R., (2008). Editorial, Physical and Health Education, 74 (1), 4-5.

Lloyd, R., (2008). Editorial, Physical and Health Education, 73 (4), 4-5.

Smith, S.J. & Lloyd, R.J. (2007). The assessment of vitality: An alternative to quantifying the health-related fitness experience , AVANTE, 11 (3).

Lloyd, R., (2007). Editorial, PHE Canada Journal, 73(3), 4-5.

Lloyd, R., (2007). Editorial, PHE Canada Journal, 73(2), 4-5.

Lloyd, R., (2007). Editorial, PHE Canada Journal, 73(1), 4-5.

Lloyd, R., (2007). Editorial, PHE Canada Journal, 72(4), 4-5.

Lloyd, R.J. & Smith, S.J., (2006). Interactive flow in exercise pedagogy, Quest, 58, 222-241.

Smith, S.J. & Lloyd, R.J., (2006). Promoting vitality in health and physical education, Qualitative Health Research, 16 (2), 245-267.

Lloyd, R., (2006). Editorial, PHE, 72 (3), 4-5.

Lloyd, R.J. & Smith, S.J. (2005). A ‘vitality’ approach to the design, implementation and evaluation of health-related physical education programs, AVANTE, 11 (2), 120-136.

Lloyd, R.J. & Smith, S.J. (2004). To move and be moved: The cultivation of motion-sensitive pedagogy, Prospero, 10(3), 4-11.

Lloyd, R., (2003). Tips from the field, Function U, 1(7), 51-61.

Lloyd, R., (2003). Training an active older adult: a personal experience, Functional U, 1(6), 12-15.

Lloyd, R.J. & Trudel, P., (1999), Verbal interactions between an eminent mental training consultant and elite level athletes: A case study, The Sport Psychologist, 13, 418-443.

Lloyd, R., (1999) Reflections on an eminent mental training consultant: A graduate students’ perspective, The Journal of Excellence, 2, 51-61.


Book Chapters:

Lloyd, R. J., de Montigny, Joanne, & Whitley, J. (2019). Comprehensive School Health in Teacher Education & Schools: Becoming a Champion of Health. In Barrett, J.M., & Scaini, C (Eds.), Physical and Health Education in Canada (1 ed., Vol. 1) (pp. 1-38). Illinois, United States: Human Kinetics.

Lloyd, R.J. & Hermans, V. (2016). Mindfully changing the metaphors by which we live: The fox and the lotus flower. In A. Ibrahim, N. Ng-A-Fook, & G. Reis (Eds.), Provoking curriculum studies: Strong poetry and the arts of the possible in education (pp. 185-198). New York, NY, United States: Taylor & Francis/Routledge.

Lloyd, R.J. & Smith, S.J. (2015). Doing motion-sensing phenomenology. In K. Tobin, & S.R. Steinberg (Eds.), Doing educational research: A handbook (Second ed.) (pp. 255-277). Rotterdam, NL, United States: Sense Publishing.

Lloyd, R.J. & Smith, S. (2014). Physical literacy. In D. Robinson, & L. Randall (Eds.), Teaching physical education in Canadian schools (pp. 226-242). Toronto, ON, Canada: Thompson Educational Publishing Inc.

Lloyd, R.J., & Smith, S.J. (2012). Health-related fitness: Enlivening the physical education experience. In S. Singleton & A. Varpalotai (Eds.), Pedagogy in motion: A community of inquiry for human movement studies (pp. 187-211). London, ON, Canada: The Althouse Press.

Lloyd, R.J. (2012). Breastfeeding mothers and lovers: An ebbing and flowing curriculum of the fluid embrace. In S. Springgay & D. Freedman (Eds.), Mothering a bodied curriculum: Emplacement, desire, affect (pp. 270-293). Toronto, ON, Canada: University of Toronto Press.

Lloyd, R.J., Garcia Bengoechea, E., & Smith, S.J. (2010). Theories of learning. In R. Bailey (Ed.), Physical education for learning: A guide for secondary schools (pp. 187-196). London, England, United Kingdom: Continuum.

Lloyd, R.J., & Smith, S.J. (2010). Feeling ‘flow motion’ in games and sports. In J. Butler, & L. Griffin (Eds.), More teaching games for understanding (pp. 89-103). Champaign, IL, United States: Human Kinetics.

Lloyd, R.J. & Smith, S.J., (2006). Motion-sensitive phenomenology, in K. Tobin & J. Kincheloe (eds.), Doing educational research: A handbook, (289-309), Sense Publishers, Boston, MA.